maniccosmicawareness Manic Cosmic Awareness
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« People are prettiest when they talk about something they really love with passion in their eyes. »

- (via caffheine)

(Source: jrileyusa)

« …the hottest places in hell are reserved for those who in a period of moral crisis maintain their neutrality. »

- Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in "Why I Am Opposed to The War in Vietnam" speech. (via knowledgeequalsblackpower)
southernbellechelle:

- Melissa Harris-Perry from her book ‘Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes and Black Women in America’

I had a conversation with a good friend just the other day on the subject of “color blindness” and the phrase “but I don’t see your race”. I thought about this excerpt during our discussion and I think it sums up my point much more eloquently than I could initially.

southernbellechelle:

- Melissa Harris-Perry from her book ‘Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes and Black Women in America’

I had a conversation with a good friend just the other day on the subject of “color blindness” and the phrase “but I don’t see your race”. I thought about this excerpt during our discussion and I think it sums up my point much more eloquently than I could initially.

« When you say to a person of color “When I see you, I don’t see you as black! I just see everybody the same.” People,think about that. You don’t have the right to say to a person “I do not see you as you are,I want to see you as I would be more comfortable seeing you.” »

- Jane Elliot on the absurdity and invalidation of claims of “Color Blindness” by white folk (via plantaplanta)
afro-dominicano:

Microaggressions


  The occurrence of specific interactions between those of different races, cultures, or genders can be interpreted as mostly non-physical aggression coined by Chester M. Pierce in 1970. Micro-inequities and micro-affirmations were additionally named by Dr. Mary Rowe of MIT in 1973, in her work she also describes micro-aggressions inclusive of sex and gender. Sue et al. (2007) describe microaggressions as, “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color.”
  
  Microagression usually involves demeaning implications and other subtle insults against minorities, and may be perpetrated against those due to gender, sexual orientation, and ability status. According to Pierce, “the chief vehicle for proracist behaviors are microaggressions. These are subtle, stunning, often automatic, and nonverbal exchanges which are ‘put-downs’ of blacks by offenders”. Microaggressions may also play a role in unfairness in the legal system as they can influence the decisions of juries.
  
  Gender
  
  Gender microassaults can be described as overt sexism: “being called a sexist name, a man refusing to wash dishes because it is ‘woman’s work,’ displaying nude pin-ups of women at places of employment, someone making unwanted sexual advances toward another person.” Gender microinsults and microinvalidations can be less apparent.
  
  Microaggressable themes have been identified through research and scholarly reviews (Sue, 2010):
  
  Sexual objectification
  
  Second-class citizenship
  
  Sexist language
  
  Assumptions of inferiority
  
  Denial of the reality of sexism
  
  Traditional gender role assumptions
  
  Invisibility
  
  Denial of individual sexism
  
  Sexist jokes
  
  Microaggressions can take a number of different forms, for example, questioning the existence of racial-cultural issues, making stereotypic assumptions, and cultural insensitivity. Some other types of microaggressions that have been identified include Colorblindness (e.g., “I don’t think of you as Black. You are just a normal person”), Denial of personal bias (e.g., “I’m not homophobic; I even have gay friends.”), and Minimization of racial-cultural issues (e.g., “Just because you feel alone in this group doesn’t mean that there’s a racial issue involved.”). “Colorblindness" in particular has been associated with higher levels of racism and lower levels of empathy.
  
  Racial Microaggressions
  
  The concept of racial microaggressions is one of the relative new contributions of Social Psychology to the understanding of factors that influence intergroup relations. Commonplace, public experiences or situations such as being stopped for a check-up at an airport, being ignored by a waiter/waitress at a restaurant or being assigned to a particular task by an employer, might seem irrelevant or innocuous situations under most circumstances. However, when such situations are interpreted as being linked to racial differences, they become distinct, and take on a different connotation. As a result, people subjected to them (racial minorities) may experience emotional pain or other negative feelings.
  
  Supporters of the theory argue that racial microaggressions are reported to be common, including among people who think of themselves as being fair and nonracist, and who have received multicultural training.
  
  According to P.C. Davis (1989), microaggression is enabled because “cognitive habit, history, and culture [has left it] unable to hear the range of relevant voices and grapple with what reasonably might be said in the voice of discrimination’s victims”.
  
  Experience
  
  Recent studies show that a wide variety of people in the United States report experience with racial microaggressions, including Latino American, African American, and Asian American people. Racial microaggressions are not limited by class or circumstance, and can be experienced by successful, upper-middle class professionals. Focus group based research with African American students at universities has also revealed that racial microaggressions exist in both academic and social spaces in the collegiate environment. College students report that they experience racial microaggressions in their relationships with their college counselors, in classrooms, and in other training relationships.
  
  People have expressed several ways in which they feel harmed by racial microaggressions, such as implied messages that may make them feel demeaned. Implied messages can range from example like, “You do not belong,” “You are abnormal,” “You are intellectually inferior,” “You cannot be trusted,” and, “You are all the same.” Recipients of these messages have also reported feeling other negative consequences, including powerlessness, invisibility, pressure to comply, loss of integrity, and pressure to represent one’s group.

afro-dominicano:

Microaggressions

The occurrence of specific interactions between those of different races, cultures, or genders can be interpreted as mostly non-physical aggression coined by Chester M. Pierce in 1970. Micro-inequities and micro-affirmations were additionally named by Dr. Mary Rowe of MIT in 1973, in her work she also describes micro-aggressions inclusive of sex and gender. Sue et al. (2007) describe microaggressions as, “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color.”

Microagression usually involves demeaning implications and other subtle insults against minorities, and may be perpetrated against those due to gender, sexual orientation, and ability status. According to Pierce, “the chief vehicle for proracist behaviors are microaggressions. These are subtle, stunning, often automatic, and nonverbal exchanges which are ‘put-downs’ of blacks by offenders”. Microaggressions may also play a role in unfairness in the legal system as they can influence the decisions of juries.

Gender

Gender microassaults can be described as overt sexism: “being called a sexist name, a man refusing to wash dishes because it is ‘woman’s work,’ displaying nude pin-ups of women at places of employment, someone making unwanted sexual advances toward another person.” Gender microinsults and microinvalidations can be less apparent.

Microaggressable themes have been identified through research and scholarly reviews (Sue, 2010):

Sexual objectification

Second-class citizenship

Sexist language

Assumptions of inferiority

Denial of the reality of sexism

Traditional gender role assumptions

Invisibility

Denial of individual sexism

Sexist jokes

Microaggressions can take a number of different forms, for example, questioning the existence of racial-cultural issues, making stereotypic assumptions, and cultural insensitivity. Some other types of microaggressions that have been identified include Colorblindness (e.g., “I don’t think of you as Black. You are just a normal person”), Denial of personal bias (e.g., “I’m not homophobic; I even have gay friends.”), and Minimization of racial-cultural issues (e.g., “Just because you feel alone in this group doesn’t mean that there’s a racial issue involved.”). Colorblindness" in particular has been associated with higher levels of racism and lower levels of empathy.

Racial Microaggressions

The concept of racial microaggressions is one of the relative new contributions of Social Psychology to the understanding of factors that influence intergroup relations. Commonplace, public experiences or situations such as being stopped for a check-up at an airport, being ignored by a waiter/waitress at a restaurant or being assigned to a particular task by an employer, might seem irrelevant or innocuous situations under most circumstances. However, when such situations are interpreted as being linked to racial differences, they become distinct, and take on a different connotation. As a result, people subjected to them (racial minorities) may experience emotional pain or other negative feelings.

Supporters of the theory argue that racial microaggressions are reported to be common, including among people who think of themselves as being fair and nonracist, and who have received multicultural training.

According to P.C. Davis (1989), microaggression is enabled because “cognitive habit, history, and culture [has left it] unable to hear the range of relevant voices and grapple with what reasonably might be said in the voice of discrimination’s victims”.

Experience

Recent studies show that a wide variety of people in the United States report experience with racial microaggressions, including Latino American, African American, and Asian American people. Racial microaggressions are not limited by class or circumstance, and can be experienced by successful, upper-middle class professionals. Focus group based research with African American students at universities has also revealed that racial microaggressions exist in both academic and social spaces in the collegiate environment. College students report that they experience racial microaggressions in their relationships with their college counselors, in classrooms, and in other training relationships.

People have expressed several ways in which they feel harmed by racial microaggressions, such as implied messages that may make them feel demeaned. Implied messages can range from example like, “You do not belong,” “You are abnormal,” “You are intellectually inferior,” “You cannot be trusted,” and, “You are all the same.” Recipients of these messages have also reported feeling other negative consequences, including powerlessness, invisibility, pressure to comply, loss of integrity, and pressure to represent one’s group.